May full moon 2021: How to see the ‘Super Flower Blood Moon’ lunar eclipse


May’s full moon, known as the Flower Moon, will be a “supermoon” as the lunar phase coincides with our satellite’s closest approach to Earth. It also coincides with the only total lunar eclipse of the year, earning it  the moniker “Super Flower Blood Moon.” So, skywatchers who miss out on the lunar eclipse can still enjoy the full moon glowing slightly bigger and brighter than normal in the night sky. 

The moon will be full on Wednesday (May 26) at 7:14 a.m. EDT (1114 GMT), according to NASA. For observers on the U.S. East Coast, the moon will be below the horizon at that point — the moon sets at 5:33 a.m. local time in New York City, for example. Moonrise in New York is at 8:53 p.m. the evening of May 26 and moonset is the next morning at 6:20 a.m., according to Time and Date. The sun sets the evening of May 26 at 8:16 p.m. local time.

Super Flower Blood Moon 2021: Where & when to see the supermoon eclipse
Webcast info: How to watch the supermoon eclipse of 2021 online

The partially eclipsed moon is pictured behind fully bloomed cherry blossoms in Utsunomiya, Japan, on April 4, 2015.

The partially eclipsed moon is pictured behind fully bloomed cherry blossoms in Utsunomiya, Japan, on April 4, 2015. (Image credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty)

Biggest supermoon of 2021

Super Flower Blood Moon Eclipse

The total lunar eclipse of Jan. 20-21, 2019, captured by astrophotographers Imelda Joson and Edwin Aguirre from the suburbs of Boston. From left to right: The start of totality, at 11:41 p.m. EST on Jan. 20; the middle of totality, at 12:12 a.m. on Jan. 21; and the end of totality at 12:44 a.m.

(Image credit: Courtesy of Imelda Joson and Edwin Aguirre)

If you take a photo of the 2021 total lunar eclipse let us know! You can send images and comments to spacephotos@space.com.





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